CBS Los Angeles

CBS Los Angeles

Poets and Dreamers
http://www.poetsanddreamserdotcom.wordpress.com

According to the owner and organizer, Anne Tammel, Poets and Dreamers was started in Southern California following Tammel’s visit to Venice, Italy in 2001. On her visit, she “found two small Pulcinella statuettes. One is playing a string instrument and the other sits dreaming and looking up to the sky. I decided to call these Pulcinellas the Poets and the Dreamers.” Noticing little support for writers in the area, Tammel was invited to start the group and encourages all types of writers to come together to collaborate. Meetings are open to the public and are free of charge. To find out about future meetings, sign up on the meetup website to stay up to date. The main goal is “to support thriving groups that work together wisely, positively and productively through the process of completion, revision and publication,” Tammel said.

Thank you, Elle Toussi of CBS Los Angeles, for sharing the word about our ever-growing network of writers, Poets and Dreamers! 

http://losangeles.cbslocal.com/top-lists/best-resources-for-aspiring-writers-in-oc/

Please join our ever-expanding group of professional and aspiring writers:

http://www.meetup.com/OCWriters-PoetsandDreamers/

As noted by CBS Los Angeles:

Poets and Dreamers
http://www.poetsanddreamserdotcom.wordpress.com

According to the owner and organizer, Anne Tammel, Poets and Dreamers was started in Southern California following Tammel’s visit to Venice, Italy in 2001. On her visit, she “found two small Pulcinella statuettes. One is playing a string instrument and the other sits dreaming and looking up to the sky. I decided to call these Pulcinellas the Poets and the Dreamers.” Noticing little support for writers in the area, Tammel was invited to start the group and encourages all types of writers to come together to collaborate. Meetings are open to the public and are free of charge. To find out about future meetings, sign up on the meetup website to stay up to date. The main goal is “to support thriving groups that work together wisely, positively and productively through the process of completion, revision and publication,” Tammel said.

Thank you, Elle Toussi of CBS Los Angeles, for sharing the word about our ever-growing network of writers, Poets and Dreamers!

http://losangeles.cbslocal.com/top-lists/best-resources-for-aspiring-writers-in-oc/

“On June 22 of 1974, about 10:15 pm, a small airplane with three passengers departed the Punta Chivato Hotel, heading to the Serenidad Hotel, about 11 minutes away. After ceased radio contact, a witness watched the plane lights disappear. It wasn’t possible to find the plane, the pilot, or its passengers. However some seats remain, and some shoes were found near the Hotel Beach.” – Hotel Serenidad Manager, Baja, CA

The doe-eyed Beverly Hills socialite never has been found. The once-opulent house where Beverly Woron spent many years, however, fabled to have been owned for a time by Burt Lancaster, still sits on a quiet sun-filled street called Linden Drive, not far from Santa Monica and Wilshire. Lined outside by lush palms, filled inside with sixties and seventies artifacts, its abundant foyer has changed little since she left. Its chipping alabaster walls display countless photos of the model, wife and mother of three.

Shot in the late sixties, the haunting black and whites of this ravishing woman on the Santa Monica beach seem more like movie stills from the forties. In them, the elegant woman runs extravagantly past the expanse of shore, lifting her white chiffon gown as if to save it from waves, laughing with the sky, so regal, determined, in love with everything. With her satin brunette hair twisted high to reveal breathing skin and vibrant, dark eyes, one could imagine she owns this beach that masquerades as the Cornish shore, her castle waiting in the distance for its celebrated mistress.

According to Vicki Krell, her younger sister with the large autumn eyes, Beverly embodied the spirit of Beverly Hills, the sparkling city that had inspired her name, taught several forms of artistic dance, painted, swam at night like a firefly, and that June promised her husband Harold she’d come back. Bevie lived in the full of motherhood, chasing her sun-haired daughter and two spirited sons across the Santa Monica sands. Featured in a 1960s issue of Sunset Magazine for her artful decorating ingénue, “Bevie just had so much more she wanted to do.” Vicki explained, “She needed to make more happen with her life.”

Over the past four decades, countless women have disappeared. Many exclusive blocks in Beverly Hills sit lined with unkempt mansions, testimony to the past, marked by a collective unwillingness to conform to the here-and-now. Why is it that this missing woman, the grand house that once belonged to her late mother Rose and this story remain so enduringly captivating?

Amid speculations that she’d called from Tijuana wanting to come back early, that she never boarded the Cessna June 22, that a photographer stalking her had sabotaged the plane, or that she simply chose to run away, her children, husband, sister and brother are still left imagining what went terribly wrong.

“I’ll tell you one thing about Bev.” Beverly’s brother Rod Krell, a retired professor, stood in the late afternoon sun amidst the busted cupboards and chafing kitchen counters. “She was steadfast. She was steady—anything she wanted to do. She just did it. We all looked to her.

“Bev was a great admirer of original and unique art. Like Salvador Dali. She loved surrealism and Francisco de Goya, who some called the father of modern art. She wanted to design clothes. And this guy flying the plane knew a lot of people in those circles who could help her into that line of work.

“So tell me, why is it you want to know all this about my sister?”

Why is it we spend our time in search of icons? I have often asked this question. Much like Amelia Earhart, Beverly inspired us to pick up and move forward, conquer our fears, to make life rich and real. Like Amelia, Beverly boarded a small plane and never returned, leaving countless around her searching, unable to continue their lives. An incalculable loss no one wanted to imagine.

Always fascinated by houses rich with history, I grew up following mysteries of celebrities who’d left us early, of missing planes, of lost ships. The unfinished stories of these two powerful women trapped in time, however, continued to haunt me on a personal level.

Having shared the same birth date as the elusive legend, I grew up searching for Amelia Earhart. She connected with each of us in an odd way; rising high above us all, accomplishing feats we’d never imagined, then leaving us.

Taking risks she knew might separate her from this world, Amelia fought from the life of women around her. Because of this, women looked to her. She lived her life in a public space, cursing through the thirties like a sailor, despising marital confines, and turning all of this vogue. For this we all looked to her. We still look to her.

Even men look to her. My uncle Bob Thelen, a World War II fighter pilot, had served as a Blue Angel in ‘47. He spoke of Amelia often with dreamy eyes. After settling near the Coronado Air Force Base, he rose at five each morning to park his motor home by the sea. Between games of Jarts and watching Aunt Rose paint her nails a crimson red, he would barbecue on a hibachi and dance to the tune of “Shine Little Glow Worm, Glimmer Glimmer,” then tell us all about Amelia. “Hey there, don’t grow dimmer, dimmer…”

We celebrated each July 24 near the moody sea with my aunt and uncle, hearing all about the missing legend, watching planes fly overhead, sometimes so loud, we could barely hear him sing. So I read her name, imagined a determined woman still traversing the skies in search of a safe spot to land. One day, I mused, I will learn all about her. One day, I learned no one knows all about her. We all still search for Amelia.

In each of us lies the desire to accomplish something heroic. Amelia soared across the Atlantic in a tiny Lockheed alone on a stormy night. First woman ever. Chasing a name, a reputation, a place of honor women don’t normally get to imagine. She knew what I was trying to understand. What Beverly must have also known. That heroicness carried with it great risk, little respect, even much less support.

Only it seemed that each other heroine who disappeared or met too early an end was shared with the world as a gift, in the form of a book, a movie, a legend to share. These figures assumed a gilded place in society forever etched with honor. Beverly, our imaginative icon, artist, estranged wife and society figure earned not even so much as an explanation.

Was she shedding off broken dreams, uncompleted desires, rising ethereally above the conflicts, refusing to be bound by the worldly weights that trap us all? Perhaps it was the fear of not growing, of being bound by fear itself that caused this woman to rise and discover her true strength, to dance heroically in those lustrous skies.

Through my search for this unsung heroine, I sometimes like to imagine I’ve caught a glimpse of the powerful artist running from the dream most American women spend their lives pursuing. Running far past that vision into a lofty expanse most of us never begin to understand.

“She loved this painting de Goya had done.” Rod stared reflectively from the sunlit kitchen into her past. “She was so amazed to see a woman as a bunch of drawers. I mean, one was out, the other was in. And Bev was like that. So original.”

Originally appeared in Interstices: an Anthology, May 2010


On the Mediterranean

Happy New Year, Everyone!
As 2012 begins, I am delighted to be showcased alongside this eclectic line-up of European writers while sharing my own impressions of the Mediterranean world. Would appreciate any thoughts you’d like to share!
http://www.mediterranean.nu/?p=2226

Call for Submissions: Publishing Opportunity

Twin Cities Hip Chicks, a Minnesota group founded by Tamara Rose, has recently gone live with a call for submissions. The upcoming anthology Tamara is compiling will be titled: Sofas I’ve Slept On.

This anthology will be a collection of essays written by regular people about a memorable sofa they’ve slept on. Simple as that; happy, sad, silly, or moving, she wants to hear from you (amateur writers are encouraged to submit)!!!

Submission Guidelines

Looking for writers of all genders, generations, ethnicities, and religions to share your story!

This anthology proposes to gather writings about sofas you’ve slept on and what brought you to them, simple as that; happy, sad, silly, or moving. These personal narratives should be written in first-person and be family friendly; PG ratings please. Submissions from writers of all levels of experience are welcome and will be read. Finally, one sofa per essay please.

Criteria:

1. Essays must be an original story (unpublished)
2. Essays must be 2,000 words or less
3. A captivating writing style and story

To Submit:

1. Essays can be submitted electronically or by way of the United States Postal Service
2. Include the complete story with a one paragraph synopsis that succinctly conveys the plot
3. Essay’s sent USPS must be typed, double-spaced, with 12pt font, and page numbered
4. Submissions must be postmarked or dated electronically by February 20, 2012
5. Submissions must be clearly marked “Sofas I’ve Slept On” in the email subject line or on the envelope
6. Submissions MUST include complete contact information including: full name, address, phone number, email, and any publishing history (if any) such as previous publications, award, and quotes from other authors or reviews
7. Multiple entries are welcome

Email Address:
submissions@sofasiveslepton.com

Mailing Address:
Sofas I’ve Slept On
PO Box 131644
Roseville, MN 55113

Essays will not be returned
Essays will not be published without the writers consent
Writers will be credited for their specific work
There is NO FEE to submit
Compensation for published submissions is yet to be determined

Thanks much!

Anne Tammel – Organizer, OC Writers: Poets and Dreamers

Annual 21st Century Book Marketing Expo

New Event:
Saturday, October 15, 2011, 8:00 AM

San Diego Marriott Marquis & Marina Hotel
333 West Harbor Drive, San Diego , CA (map)

Go to http://mixiv.com/vp/60602/19364/

Many in the industry are looking forward to this year’s event which will be held October 15-16, 2011 at the San Diego Marriott Marquis & Marina Hotel in San Diego, California The event will again as a vehicle to educate Self-Published Authors, Small Publishers and Writers on how to master the changing publishing industry, understand the benefits of Print-On-Demand, get the publicity they deserve and utilize the internet to get their book in the hands of readers.

In two days attendees will get the opportunity to network with industry leaders and learn how to separate themselves from the pack. Seminar leaders and speakers have included some of the publishing industry’s most renowned book marketing experts: John Kremer, Jack Canfield (Chicken Soup for the Soul), Arielle Ford and Arianna Huffington. Ticket information is as follows:

General Admission – $497 – 50% Discount until April 1, 2011 – Pay only – $248.50

Bring a Friend or Colleague for only $100 more. Total charge – $597 for two. – 50% Discount until April 1, 2011 – Get 2 tickets for only $298.50

General Admission includes: Access to all Workshops & Panels Saturday & Sunday Speed Networking Sessions Saturday & Sunday Keynote Addresses

You can use the link below to visit the expo’s official website and to purchase the 50% off discounted tickets: http://mixiv.com/vp/60602/19364/

New Event: Open Mic Night for Authors, Musicians and Entertainers

Join us at Open Mic Night!

Every Wednesday | 7:30 pm – 9:30pm

Open Mic Night at Paradise Perks has been creating a buzz around town. Poetry, singing, music, laughter, conversation — and the occassional shiver up the back of the neck.

Come out to Paradise Perks and share in the excitement of true performance art!

If you plan to read / sing / perform, sign up with the barista–we look forward to seeing you!

(Open Mic Night is a drop-in event. No need to RSVP on this site unless you’re coordinating your visit with others.)

Wednesday, September 21, 2011, 7:30 PM

SELECTED BY: ANNE TAMMEL, MFA

for authors of literary arts

“Make the most of yourself, for that is all there is of you.” -Ralph Waldo Emerson

About Poets and Dreamers

We are a multi-faceted circle of both creative and professional writers gathering at writing workshops throughout Southern California. Our in-depth discussions inspire a brilliant exchange of literary insights, and ultimately, the fruition of our dreams.

-Our writers gather weekly or bi-weekly as professional, cohesive groups to collaborate on the craft.

-We encourage wise creative experimentation while drawing on the collective genius of our literary masters.

-We devote a generous amount of time to in-depth exploration of each writer’s work.

-Viable works-in-progress and a commitment to interact positively/professionally are crucial.

-Our main goal: to support thriving groups that work together wisely, positively and productively through the process of completion, revision and publication.

We look forward to working with you as you establish and meet your goals as a writer.

Important elements you should bring to the group:

-Writing background, or an intense desire to create great works

-Writing ability

-Viable work(s)-in-progress

-Commitment to interact positively and exchange critiques in a professional format.

If you would like to take part as a crucial contributor to this intensive, collaborative experience, join our creative circle today and work with us!

Anne Tammel, Poets and Dreamers


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